Recipes

This section is a collection of recipes that either contains blood or raw meat. Most of these recipes are traditional or even commonplace in some parts of the world. Wherever possible I have tried to include a little bit of the history or culture behind these recipes. Hopefully the vampires and nonvampires will find them equally as tasty.

The blood called for in these recipes can usually be obtained by a well stocked butcher. Personally I would avoid the ones in commercial grocery stores and supermarkets because they can only obtain what is available through their franchise. Greatest success in obtaining blood for use in these recipes seems to be from traditional or old time Asian, German, Polish or European butchers. Most of the time I try to obtain kosher beef blood for my recipes due to their stricter guidelines for purity and cleanliness when obtaining the blood. Substituting kosher beef blood when the recipe calls for blood from a different animal does affect the flavor a little but it's a trade off that I feel is acceptable.




Blood Pancakes (Veriohukaiset)

Blood pancakes among other blood dishes are very popular in Finland and other parts of Scandinavia. These pancakes are served often on holidays. Some places in Scandinavia sell them already packaged and ready to go, heat and serve.

  • 1 3/4 cup pork blood
  • 1 3/4 cup milk
  • 1 3/4 cup rye flour
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp dark molasses
  • 1/2 - 1 tsp salt
  • pinch of pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon of dried marjoram
  • 1 small onion
  • butter
  • If the blood is frozen, let it thaw overnight in refrigerator.
    Finely mince the onion and saute it in a little butter until softened and translucent. Let cool.
    Strain the blood into a bowl.
    Whisk together the blood and the milk.
    Add the molasses, salt and pepper and the marjoram.
    Gradually whisk in the flour and stir until the mixture is smooth.
    Add the onion into the batter.
    Cover the batter and let it rest for at least an hour, so that the flour will swell.

    Heat a flat frying pan until very hot.
    Generously butter the pan and pour a first batch of the batter in the rounds.
    Fry until the bubbles on the batter surface begin to set and flip the pancakes over.
    Continue frying with the rest of the batter.
    *Serve the blood pancakes hot, accompanied by lingonberry jam or cranberry sauce.





    Blood and Beer Pancakes


    • 1/2 pint calf's or sheep's blood
    • 5 ounces beer
    • 1 egg
    • 1 small onion
    • 4 tablespoons rye flour
    • 4 tablespoons barley flour
    • 1 pinch mixed herbs
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 2 ounces butter

    • Strain the blood into a bowl.
      Finely mince the onion and saute it in a little butter until softened and translucent. Let cool.
      Add the beer, beaten egg, herbs, seasoning and flour to the blood.
      Stir well until the batter is smooth then let it rest for at least an hour.
      Heat a flat frying pan until very hot.
      Generously butter the pan and pour a first batch of the batter in the rounds.
      Fry until the bubbles on the batter surface begin to set and flip the pancakes over.
      Continue frying with the rest of the batter.
      Serve the pancakes hot with cranberry jelly and melted butter.






      Blood Bread

      This is an old recipe that is popular in Finland. Traditionally it is made with graham flour but sometimes it is hard to find in stores. If you have trouble getting graham flour you can substitute either whole-wheat flour or rye flour.



      • 1 packet of active dry yeast
      • 1/2 cup warm water (body temperature)
      • 1 1/2 cups graham flour
      • 1 cups boiling water
      • 3/8 cup shortening, melted
      • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
      • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
      • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
      • 1 pint pork blood
      • 3 cups medium rye flour
      • 2 cups bread flour

      • Soak the yeast in the cup of warm water for 5 minutes to soften.
        In a large bowl, use a wooden spoon to mix together the graham flour and boiling water until smooth.
        Stir in the yeast water, melted shortening, salt, cloves, and allspice.
        Mix in blood until well blended, then stir in rye flour and bread flour 1 cup at a time, and stir until dough no longer sticks to the spoon or the sides of the bowl.
        Sprinkle flour over the top of the dough, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.
        When dough has doubled, punch down, and spoon dough into six 9x5 inch loaf pans.Let rise again until dough is doubled in size.
        Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Grease the tops of the loaves.
        Bake loaves for 1 hour in the preheated oven or until tops are browned and loaves sound hollow when tapped on the bottom.





        Drisheen


        Drisheen is often viewed as a type of English black pudding made in Ireland and very popular in specialty stores in Cork or Dublin. Irish black pudding, made from a mixture of cow's, pig's and/or sheep's blood, milk, salt, fat and breadcrumbs which is boiled and sieved and finally cooked using the main intestine of an animal (typically a pig or sheep) as the sausage skin. The sausage is usually flavored with herbs, such as Tansy, but since tansy is difficult to find, thyme is used instead. Drisheen is often mixed up with pudding as it is similar to pudding in many respects. Recipes for drisheen vary widely from place to place and it also differs depending on the time of year.



        • 2 cups blood (sheep, pig, turkey, goose)
        • 1 tsp salt
        • 1 cup cream of full - cream milk
        • 1 cup of bread crumbs or oatmeal
        • 1/3 tsp of pepper
        • Pinch of mace
        • Sprig of thyme (or tansy which is more traditional)

        • Add the salt to the blood to help keep it liquid.
          Mix the blood with the cream.
          Mixed in the bread crumbs, pepper, mace and tansy.
          Put into greased glass pan and bake at 300 - 350 F (149 - 177 C) for about 1 hour.
          Cool and keep in refrigerator.
          Drisheen is sliced and either fried or grilled, often with bacon, eggs and other sausages.





          Steak Tartare


          It is said that this dish, in it's most basic form, dates back to the Mongols under Genghis Khan when the soldiers would carry patties of raw meat under their saddles. At mealtime these patties were found to be softened and easier for the men to eat while the army was on the move. Today steak tartare is considered a gourmet dish. It is especially popular in Belgium, the Netherlands, Northern Germany, France, Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic (Tatarak) and Switzerland.
          Modern health concerns have reduced the popularity of this dish due to the danger of contamination by bacteria and parasites. If you have a weakened immune system or are ill in any way then to be on the safe side I'd suggest avoiding the recipes that are served raw. The Mexican version of steak tartare typically marinates the meat in limejuice, similar to ceviche, which has the effect of disinfecting the meat to a certain extent. Many versions marinate the raw beef in wine or some other form of alcohol will have a similar effect, especially if the liquid used is distilled.
          Often these dishes are served with toast points, crackers, fresh bread or even french-fries on the side.
          I have tried to include a few variations of this dish to suite individual tastes. All the tartare recipes below serve 4 unless stated otherwise.





          Basic Steak Tartare


          • handful of fresh greens, chopped (Basil, Arugula, or lettace)
          • 1/4 of one Onion, chopped
          • 2 tablespoons stone ground mustard
          • 3/4 teaspoon salt
          • 1/2 teaspoon pepper, freshly ground
          • dashes hot sauce (such as Tabasco)
          • Olive Oil, between none and 1/4 cup, your preference
          • 1 pound freshly ground Beef, round or tenderloin
          • 2 to 4 large egg yolks, one per serving
          • Make a bed of the fresh greens for each separate serving, two to four servings.
            Gently mix together all remaining ingredients except the egg yolks.
            When well combined divide the beef into servings.
            Make a small well in the center of each serving.
            Gently slide the egg yolk into the well.
            Serve immediately.





            Another Version of Basic Steak Tartare


            • 1 pound finely ground beef tenderloin
            • 1 teaspoon brown mustard
            • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco)
            • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
            • 1 teaspoon brandy
            • 1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
            • ground pepper to taste
            • 1 egg
            • In a medium bowl, mix together the beef, mustard, hot pepper sauce, Worcestershire sauce, brandy, salt, pepper and egg until well blended.
              Arrange the meat in a neat pile on a glass dish, and cover with aluminum foil.
              Refrigerate for 30 minutes to allow the flavors to blend.
              Serve as a spread on crackers or toast.
              Serves 6 as an appetizer.





              Herbed and Spicy Steak Tartare


              • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
              • 2 teaspoons stone ground mustard
              • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
              • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
              • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
              • 2 teaspoons cognac
              • 1/3 teaspoon ground cumin
              • 1/3 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
              • 3/4 teaspoon salt
              • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
              • 6 tablespoons parsley
              • 1 tablespoon chopped basil
              • 2 tablespoons chopped chives
              • 1 1/2 pound chilled and freshly ground beef
              • Mix the 2 mustards in a large bowl.
                Add the lemon juice, cream, oil, Cognac, cumin, cayenne, salt and pepper.
                Mix well, and then add the parsley, basil and chives.
                Add the ground beef and mix thoroughly with two forks, aerating the mixture rather than squashing it or turning it.
                Divide the tartare into 4 serving dishes and serve immediately, with various salads and toasted bread.





                Fancy Steak Tartare


                • 3 medium oil-packed anchovy fillets, rinsed and minced
                • 2 teaspoons brined capers, drained and rinsed
                • 3 teaspoons Dijon mustard
                • 2 large egg yolks
                • 10 ounces prime beef tenderloin, cut into small dice, covered, and refrigerated
                • 2 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
                • 2 tablespoons finely chopped Italian parsley leaves
                • 4 teaspoons olive oil
                • 3 dashes hot sauce (such as Tabasco)
                • 4 dashes Worcestershire sauce
                • 3/4 teaspoon crushed chile flakes
                • Combine anchovies, capers, and mustard in a nonreactive bowl.
                  Using a fork or the back of a spoon, mash ingredients until evenly combined.
                  Mix in egg yolks.
                  Use a rubber spatula to fold remaining ingredients into mustard mixture until thoroughly combined. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
                  Serve immediately with toast points or french fries.





                  Armenian Steak Tartare (Chee Kufta)


                  Serves 12 -16 on 1 large plate


                  • 2 1/2 lbs lean ground meat (London Broil or top round)
                  • 2 1/4 cups fine ground cracked wheat (bulgur)
                  • 2 cups cold water
                  • 2 tablespoons tomato sauce
                  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
                  • 1 tablespoon basil
                  • 3 cups onions, chopped fine
                  • 1 bunch parsley, chopped
                  • 1 large green pepper, chopped
                  • Combine vegetables and basil together and mix well.
                    In a large bowl combine 2 cups of chopped vegetables and mix the bulgur, water, tomato sauce and salt.
                    Mix well and let stand 10 minutes.
                    Add meat and blend well.
                    Knead about 5 minutes, moistening your hands with cold water at intervals.
                    Taste for salt. Add more if necessary.
                    Place on platter and shape as desired.
                    Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and green onions and any remaining chopped vegetables.
                    Eat with pita bread or crusty french bread.





                    Mexican Style Steak Tartare


                    • 2 tablespoons lime juice
                    • 2 tablespoons tomato sauce
                    • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
                    • 2 teaspoons tequila
                    • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
                    • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
                    • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
                    • 3/4 teaspoon salt
                    • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
                    • 6 tablespoons cilantro
                    • 2 tablespoons chopped chives
                    • 1 1/2 pound chilled and freshly ground beef
                    • In a large bowl combine the lime juice, tomato sauce, oil, tequila, cumin, cayenne, salt and pepper.
                      Mix well, and then add the cilantro and chives.
                      Add the ground beef and mix thoroughly with two forks, aerating the mixture rather than squashing it or turning it.
                      Divide the tartare into 4 serving dishes and serve immediately, with various salads and toasted bread.





                      V Luna
                      Page Updated January 2012